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E N G L I S H

S U M M E R S C H O O L

2012


Teacher’s handbook








Welcome to an exciting summer of English language and spiritual reflection

The English Summer School



The annual English Summer School (ESS) is an intensive English course which provides opportunities for spiritual growth, serious work and fun. The ESS is an important project jointly sponsored by the Ukrainian Catholic University (UCU) of Lviv, Ukraine and the Ukrainian Catholic Education Foundation. Its primary objectives are to enable students to immerse themselves in an English speaking community in order to become fluent English speakers and to create a prayerful, retreat-like environment in keeping with Eastern Christian traditions.

^

Ukrainian Catholic University


In founding the Lviv Theological Academy (LTA) in 1928, Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky made the first step in the creation of a Ukrainian Catholic University. Even though the Soviets closed the Academy in 1944, the Academy alumni formed the backbone of the underground Ukrainian Catholic Church during the subsequent decades of persecution. In 1963, the exiled Ukrainian churchman Josyf Cardinal Slipyj organized a prototype Ukrainian Catholic University in Rome. In 1994, soon after the declaration of Ukrainian independence, the LTA was reestablished with a broad student body of male and female lay people and religious, as well as seminarians. In 2001, Pope John Paul II blessed the foundation stone of the new UCU building. Later that year, the Faculty of History and the Licentiate in Theology program joined the already established Faculty of Philosophy and Theology. In 2002, the University was ceremoniously inaugurated as the first Catholic University on the territory of the former Soviet Union. There is great hope of building a new site for the Ukrainian Catholic University, which will provide the possibility of spreading the Good News of Christ throughout the world and also realise the dreams and plans of our distinguished ancestors.
^

Ukrainian Catholic Education Foundation



Established in 1997, the Ukrainian Catholic Education Foundation (UCEF) informs Americans, Canadians, Brits, and Australians about the academic and financial needs of the Ukrainian Catholic Church and its educational institutions in Ukraine. We foster the communion of Ukrainian Americans with the Ukrainian nation and of Roman Catholics in the West with the largest Eastern Catholic Church. The UCEF Exchange Programs provide opportunities both for Ukrainian students to study or intern in North America and for English speaking teachers and professors to volunteer in Ukraine. By bringing native English speakers to Ukraine for intensive English summer institutes, the UCEF helps those from non-Ukrainian backgrounds to learn about this exciting part of the world.

Volunteers

The English Summer School each year attracts around thirty volunteers from North America and the United Kingdom to come to Ukraine for a month and share their work, prayer and recreation with college age seminarians and lay students of UCU. The teaching staff, the majority of whom are not of Ukrainian descent, create a dynamic immersion environment which gives the students an opportunity to overcome the normal psychological barriers in speaking a foreign language.

The other focus of the ESS experience is spiritual growth. Teachers are asked to take an active part in the liturgical life of the ESS. For many Roman Catholic and Protestant volunteers, the Byzantine Liturgy is a new experience. This tradition is rich and beautiful and has a great deal to offer all Christians.


Academic program
^

Academic Life


Students of the Ukrainian Catholic University study English during the academic year and all students at the ESS will have already learnt basic English grammar. UCU’s aim for the coming ESS 2012 is to create two levels of the school – basic (for the students who participate in ESS for the first time) and upper (for the students who participate in the ESS for the second or third time). In this account we will need at least thirty volunteer teachers to work with 120 students. The focus of the basic level of the summer program is on developing listening and speaking skills and improving vocabulary. Occasionally, it may be useful to review or teach a point of grammar, but usually that is better done by experienced language teachers in a systematic way during the academic year.

The students who will be attending the ESS for the first time will initially be overwhelmed by the immersion into a world of native speakers. These students have had at least one year of English classes but they will need encouragement and a lot of repetition during the first week. Their greatest need is to expand their vocabulary.

English has immense vocabulary and this is a continuing challenge for students at all levels. Teachers should concentrate on ways of repeating, reviewing and practicing the vocabulary which arises from class work. You can expect many students to be encountering at least one new word or phrase each minute, which means fifty words per hour or several hundred each day. This can be overwhelming for them and easy for native-speaking teachers to forget. Obviously, teachers must limit the words they decide to concentrate on. Be prepared to write new words on the board and to review and reinforce the students’ lists of new words each day.

Usually, two teachers are assigned to each class.

The focus of the upper level of the ESS is on academic writing, so that the students will be able to write any kinds of official and friendly letters, CVs, applications forms, etc and intense practice of the language skills in preparation for international English Exams, such as FCE, TOEFL, etc. The students of this level have attended the ESS the previous summer and will be able to operate at the intermediate level and carry on a viable conversation.


The Academic Program is centred on five daily classes, three in the morning and two in the afternoon. 1. Morning Classes: Scripture study (one class); vocabulary, grammar and communication exercises (two classes). 2. Afternoon Classes: Extended reading and Electives. 3. Tutoring. 4. Evening Activities like study hall, spiritual talks, a movie, sports or board-games night, a talent show and a bonfire or disco to round off the day.

Since two teachers are always assigned to each class, they can help each other or do some in-class-tutoring.


Two levels will have slightly different daily schedules, whereas some evening activities will be organised for both of the levels together.


^ BASIC LEVEL


1. Morning Classes

Morning classes start at 9:45. There are three, 55-minute classes in the morning, each given by the teachers to a group of 8-10 students. The first of these classes should be dedicated to Scripture reading and for this purpose the students are provided with Bibles (for the ease of first-time students use a simple Bible version which has a limited vocabulary base). This is an opportunity to practice pronunciation and to discuss spiritual questions.


The contents of the other morning classes are speaking, listening, grammar practice and vocabulary building. The structure is mainly for the teachers to decide. For what concerns books and manuals from which to take materials and ideas, the school has a small library where the teachers can search for what they need. In addition, we provide the groups with sets of manuals of the appropriate levels which the teachers are encouraged to use. Teachers are encouraged to bring English-language materials which would be appropriate for student use (e.g. magazines, newspapers, photos, audio-visual materials).


In the cases where teachers have their own method of how to teach and what to use they are welcome to follow their own line on condition that it is effective and to the learners’ benefit. We would like to point out here that the summer school has its Academic Director who you can turn to in the case of lack of ideas or some other academic difficulties. We would also like to stress that the Academic Director has the final authority for everything concerning the teaching.


Also, it should be noted that the students are expected to keep journals of their experiences as a means of practicing writing. The students must write their journals daily. The teachers may explain specific expectations. Writing in class can also be done for the journal, but class notes and lists of new words should be kept separately. Journals will be collected every day and are intended to be an opportunity to express thoughts and feelings, to review what has been taught that day and to experiment with new ideas. Journal entries do not need to be perfect – what is most important is to write a lot and to write frequently.


^ 2. Afternoon Classes

The first afternoon class is focused on extended reading. This class encourages students to improve their skill in reading for comprehension. Using simple texts, typically read aloud, enables discussing simple literary or cultural issues. Students develop their reading as well as their speaking skills through the lexical or grammatical analysis of the texts they have read and through the discussion of these texts in class. The teachers are free to choose the reading material. As has already been mentioned, the school has its own library, including different reading materials, but to make it easier for the teachers, they are free to bring their own materials to be read with the students. It may happen that the material, the teacher has brought is inappropriate to the level of the students, s/he teaches, in this case teachers can share the materials and help one another in this way. If the volunteer decides to prepare the reading material beforehand, s/he should keep in mind that the texts have to be interesting, not too long (short stories are most effective) and not containing too many difficult vocabulary items.


3. Electives

Starting on the second day of the Summer School we have elective classes. The teachers are expected to prepare two such mini-courses. They will teach one course the first week and one the second week during the Elective periods, with the possibility of repeating one course during the last week of ESS. These week-long classes (one-hour and fifteen minutes each afternoon for 5 days) allow the teachers and students to discuss subjects based on the special interests and knowledge of the volunteer teachers. Previous subjects have included: Cartoons and Comic Books, American Protestantism, Gender Roles in Ukraine and the U.S., Morality and the Media, Christology, Democracy in America, Poverty in America, National Parks, Greece and the Holy Land Pilgrimages, Lives of the Saints, Marian Shrines, Philosophy and Ethics, Evangelisation, and American Music (Ukrainians love music and singing). After a day of speaking in a foreign language students prefer interactive formats rather than lectures. One-page articles are useful for discussion, as well as audio or visual material.


The students choose which electives they would like to take. The electives, like the other classes, have as their central purpose the teaching of English, so they should be interactive. Please bring easy materials for students to read or interact with on the topics you have in mind. Please remember that the majority of students, sadly, are not of a very high level, nevertheless they are very eager to learn and extend their knowledge.


3. Tutoring

From Monday to Friday between 9 pm and 10 pm the Tutoring takes place. In three twenty - minute – periods, teachers make themselves available for one-to-one-conversations with the students or offering any other kind of assistance (e.g. helping on the home assignment, etc.). Every day, lists with the available teachers in which the students can put their names are published. That is a unique possibility to practice and improve communication skills. Students are to be encouraged by the teachers as well to make frequent use of it. The experience shows that this is an excellent tool to help the students to overcome the above mentioned psychological difficulties to talk in English. The teachers are invited to inform the Academic Director after the daily morning assembly if they are willing to be available for tutoring; however, those teachers who do not have an Elective class are put on the list automatically.


^ 4. Evening Activities

In the evenings there is a mixture of group activities, spiritual programs, sports and study. It should be emphasised here that no matter what the activity is (whether it is a volleyball game or study hall) the teachers are expected to be there with the students (as much as possible) in order to preserve the total immersion into the English language atmosphere and to help the students to resist the temptation to slip into their mother tongue. Volunteer teachers are asked to bring language games and board games (e.g. Scrabble, Apples to Apples, etc.) to be used once a week during board-games nights.


Daily Timetable (ESS – Basic Level)

7:00

Wake up

7:40 - 8:45

Divine Liturgy

8:45 - 9:30

Breakfast

9:30 - 9:45

Morning Assembly

9:45 -10:40

Scripture Study Class

10:40 - 10:50

Break

10:50 - 11:45

Class I

11:45 - 11:55

Break

11:55 - 12:40

Class II

12:40 - 1:00

Break

1:00 - 2:00

Lunch, Recreation

2:00 - 3:00

Reading class (Monday, Wednesday, Friday)

3:00 - 3:15

Break

3:15 - 4:30

Electives

4:30 - 6:45

Reflection time

6:00 - 6:45

Vespers (Wednesday, Friday, Feast Days)

6:50 - 7:30

Supper

7:45 - 9:00

Evening Activity (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) or Free Time

9:00 - 10:00

Evening Tutoring

8:00 - 9:30

Evening Tutoring (Tuesday, Thursday)

9:30 - 11:00/

10:00 - 11:00

Free time and private study

11:00

Great Silence



^ UPPER LEVEL


1. Morning Classes

Morning classes start at 9:45. There are two, 90-minute classes in the morning, each given by the teachers to a group of 8-10 students.

The content of the first morning class is intensive practice of all the language skills in the format of preparation for the international English exams. The focus of the second class is academic writing. Teachers provide the students with the main rules of writing different official letters and documents, the structure, language, style and other important points. Students practice writing in class and also do the home assignment on writing each day.

The structure of these classes is mainly for the teachers to decide. For what concerns books and manuals from which to take materials and ideas, the school has a small library where the teachers can search for what they need. In addition, we provide the groups with sets of manuals of the appropriate levels which the teachers are encouraged to use. Teachers are encouraged to bring English-language materials which would be appropriate for student use (e.g. magazines, newspapers, photos, audio-visual materials).

In the cases where teachers have their own method of how to teach and what to use they are welcome to follow their own line on condition that it is effective and to the learners’ benefit. We would like to point out here that the summer school has its Academic Director who you can turn to in the case of lack of ideas or some other academic difficulties. We would also like to stress that the Academic Director has the final authority for everything concerning the teaching.


Also, it should be noted that the students are expected to keep “academic journals” as a means of practicing writing. The students must write their journals daily. The teachers may explain specific expectations. Writing in class can also be done for the journal, but class notes and lists of new words should be kept separately. Journals will be collected every day and are intended to be an opportunity to practice academic writing.


^ 2. Scripture Study Class


The first of the afternoon classes should be dedicated to Scripture reading and for this purpose the students are provided with Bibles. This is an opportunity to practice pronunciation and to discuss spiritual questions.


3. Electives

Starting on the second day of the Summer School we have elective classes. The teachers are expected to prepare two such mini-courses. They will teach one course the first week and one the second week during the Elective periods, with the possibility of repeating one course during the last week of ESS. These week-long classes (one-hour and fifteen minutes each afternoon for 5 days) allow the teachers and students to discuss subjects based on the special interests and knowledge of the volunteer teachers. Previous subjects have included: Cartoons and Comic Books, American Protestantism, Gender Roles in Ukraine and the U.S., Morality and the Media, Christology, Democracy in America, Poverty in America, National Parks, Greece and the Holy Land Pilgrimages, Lives of the Saints, Marian Shrines, Philosophy and Ethics, Evangelisation, and American Music (Ukrainians love music and singing). After a day of speaking in a foreign language students prefer interactive formats rather than lectures. One-page articles are useful for discussion, as well as audio or visual material.


The students choose which electives they would like to take. The electives, like the other classes, have as their central purpose the teaching of English, so they should be interactive. Please bring easy materials for students to read or interact with on the topics you have in mind. Please remember that the majority of students, sadly, are not of a very high level, nevertheless they are very eager to learn and extend their knowledge.


3. Tutoring

From Monday to Friday between 8 pm and 9 pm the Tutoring takes place. In three twenty - minute – periods, teachers make themselves available for one-to-one-conversations with the students or offering any other kind of assistance (e.g. helping on the home assignment, etc.). Every day, lists with the available teachers in which the students can put their names are published. That is a unique possibility to practice and improve communication skills. Students are to be encouraged by the teachers as well to make frequent use of it. The experience shows that this is an excellent tool to help the students to overcome the above mentioned psychological difficulties to talk in English. The teachers are invited to inform the Academic Director after the daily morning assembly if they are willing to be available for tutoring; however, those teachers who do not have an Elective class are put on the list automatically.


^ 4. Evening Activities

In the evenings there is a mixture of group activities, spiritual programs, sports and study. It should be emphasised here that no matter what the activity is (whether it is a volleyball game or study hall) the teachers are expected to be there with the students (as much as possible) in order to preserve the total immersion into the English language atmosphere and to help the students to resist the temptation to slip into their mother tongue. Volunteer teachers are asked to bring language games and board games (e.g. Scrabble, Apples to Apples, etc.) to be used during board-games nights.


Daily Timetable (ESS – Upper Level)

7:00

Wake up

7:40 - 8:45

Divine Liturgy

8:45 - 9:30

Breakfast

9:30 - 9:45

Morning Assembly

9:45 - 11:15

Class I

11:15 - 11:30

Break

11:30 - 1:00

Class II

1:00 - 1:10

Break

1:10 - 2:00

Lunch, Recreation

2:00 - 3:00

Scripture Study Class

3:00 - 3:15

Break

3:15 - 4:30

Electives

4:30 - 6:45

Reflection time

6:00 - 6:45

Vespers (Wednesday, Friday, Feast Days)

6:50 - 7:30

Supper

8:00 - 9:00

Evening Tutoring

8:00 - 9:30

Evening Tutoring (Tuesday, Thursday)

9:30 - 11:00/

9:00 - 11:00

Free time and private study

11:00

Great Silence



Summer School Requirements

a) For the students

In order that the school does not turn into total entertainment the students should work regularly and their work should be continuously assessed. For this purpose the teachers will be asked to follow the formula "presentation – practice – testing," which means that every new item that you introduce (be it a new grammatical structure, or a group of words, or a collection of useful everyday expressions) has to be practiced (for the students to retain it) and finally tested (for you to see if you have managed to put your message across and if it has been understood by the students). This means that by the end of the school students will have written at least 3 tests, supposing that there has been one test per week. At the very end of the summer school students will write their final tests. In addition to that, students have to write their journals every day. This means that every single day they should have a written task to complete which later has to be checked by the teacher.

The summer school is graded on the Common European Framework basis, which means that each student has to gain at least 60 points out of 100 to pass the ESS. In order to receive credit for the summer school, students must attend all classes and scheduled activities, and hand in a satisfactory journal written daily.


Attendance of classes is obligatory! If the students miss more than a tenth of classes they will not receive the final certificate. In order to integrate the students’ academic performance and class attendance we suggest the following scheme:


Grading :

Class attendance

10 points

Journals

30 points

Results of minor tests

30 points

Result of final examination

30 points




100 points total



There is an important observation to be made here: the summer school is not only about learning English, it is also about living a rich spiritual life through participation in different religious services and evening activities. This should certainly be taken into account when the final grade is calculated. If a person is not very good at learning languages but does his or her best, takes an active part in the summer school life and is regularly present at the liturgies then the teacher can certainly give a higher grade than that resulting from the above mentioned calculation.


Award of Certificates

At the end of the School certificates are awarded to students who have:

  • fulfilled the Summer School requirements (who have written all the tests with good results and submitted their journals regularly)

  • achieved a final grade of more than 60 points

  • missed no more than one-tenth of their classes

  • behaved in conformity with the general rules of the Summer School.


b) For the teachers

Besides the implications for the teachers resulting from the students’ requirements we want to inform the volunteers that we would like all the classes to be taught if possible by both of them. Teachers should make themselves available as often as possible for tutoring and are expected to take part in the evening activities, especially the Study Hall. We would like to remind the volunteers that the church services are an integral part of the program, too. It goes without saying that attendance at the services is much easier than all the work involved in having extra classes which would necessarily take place if we didn't have the services. In one word: Follow the teachers’ handbook and respect the authority of the ESS staff!


Religion and Spirituality


The religious component as an integral part of the whole program has already been mentioned. Each day begins with Divine Liturgy. Celebrating the Eucharist as a community is not only a great way to start the day but reminds everyone of our call to love, prayer, and service. Vespers is celebrated before dinner. A voluntary morning-prayer-group is usually spontaneously started by students and teachers. The volunteers who actively participate in the spiritual life of the program will experience the real presence of the Holy Spirit, a renewed sense of God’s love and what it means to follow Christ.


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